Human-Centered Computing

Department of Computer Science

Papers

Paper

One Byte at a Time: Insights about Meaningful Data for Sustainable Food Consumption Practices

Martin, EunJeong, Mikael, and Dimitrios got a paper accepted at DIS21 on meaningful data sustainable food consumption practices

Martin Lindrup, EunJeong Cheon, Mikael B. Skov, Dimitrios Raptis Abstract Data have played an extensive role in sustainable HCI research by informing the impacts of our behavior on the environment and helping us make better environmental choices. However, in the area of sustainable food consumption and sustainable HCI, there is little investigation on the roles of food data for the design of technology. This paper presents findings from a qualitative study of sustainable-conscious individuals’ food data seeking experiences. Our results show the way in which the current food data is challenging our understanding of its environmental impacts, which concern data of availability, data representations, and data cultures. Drawing from Loukissas’ six critical data principles, we discuss how “locality” and "place" could cast a new insight on food and its sustainability. We also offer possible design directions for sustainable HCI technologies utilizing food data.

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Domestic Robots and the Dream of Automation: Understanding Human Interaction and Intervention

Eike, Anne Marie, Jesper and Mikael got a paper accepted at CHI'21 on automation in the home using robots.

Eike Schneiders, Anne Marie Kanstrup, Jesper Kjeldskov, Mikael B. Skov Abstract Domestic robots such as vacuum cleaners or lawnmowers are becoming popular consumer products in private homes, but while current HCI research on domestic robots has highlighted for example personalisation, long-term effects, or design guidelines, little attention has been paid to automation. To address this, we conducted a qualitative study with 24 participants in private households using interviews, contextual technology tours, and robot deployment. Through thematic analysis we identified three themes related to 1) work routines and automation, 2) domestic robot automation and the physical environment, as well as 3) interaction and breakdown intervention. We present an empirical understanding of how task automation using domestic robots can be implemented in the home. Lastly, we discuss our findings in relation to existing literature and highlight three opportunities for improved task automation using domestic robots for future research.

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Paper

What Do Hackathons Do?]{What Do Hackathons Do?

Understanding Participation in Hackathons Through Program Theory Analysis

Jeanette Falk, Goopinath Kannabiran, Nicolai Brodersen Hansen Abstract Coming at @CHI'21 Hackathons are increasingly embraced across diverse sectors as a way of democratizing the design of technology. Several attempts have been made to redefine the format and desired end goal of hackathons in recent years thereby warranting closer methodological scrutiny. In this paper, we apply program theory to analyze the processes and effects of 16 hackathon case studies through published research literature. Building upon existing research on hackathons, our work offers a critical perspective examining the methodological validity of hackathons and exemplifies how specific processes for organizing hackathons are modified for different purposes. Our main contribution is a program theory analysis of hackathon formats that provides an exploration and juxtaposition of 16 case studies in terms of causal relations between the input, process and the effects of hackathons. Our cataloguing of examples can serve as an inspirational planning resource for future organizers of hackathons.

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Chaos and Creativity in Dynamic Idea Evaluation: Theorizing the Organization of Problem-Based Portfolios

Accepted in the Creativity and Innovation Management Journal

Frank Ulrich & Peter Axel Nielsen Abstract Facilitating creativity effectively requires attendance to the complex nature of idea development and the later maturation of the produced ideas. In this theoretical piece, we add something entirely new to the creativity management literature by exploring how the knowledge generated during idea evaluation can facilitate the creation of problem-based portfolios. We build upon the latest advances in utilizing knowledge from the idea evaluation process to facilitate divergent and convergent production—coined as dynamic idea evaluation (DIE). Using DIE as the theoretical platform, we use chaos theory to explore the complex duality between creative production and the creative negotiation processes in idea evaluation to outline the systemic properties of problem-based portfolios. We theorize that balancing creative sensitive dependency towards convergent and divergent production is vital to understand how people use negotiations to dynamically transform the knowledge they generate during idea evaluation into the improvement of existing ideas and the creation of novel ideas and problem definitions. We also posit that problem definitions will cluster ideas and knowledge about those ideas into dynamic portfolios.

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Exploring the Non-Use of Mobile Devices in Families through Provocative Design

Anders Bruun, Rikke Hagensby Jensen, Jesper Kjeldskov, Jeni Paay, Camilla Mejlby Hansen, Katarína Leci Sakáčová, and Mette Hyllested Larse Abstract Mobile devices are fast becoming an integral part of family life. While mobile technology provides constant connectivity to a world outside the home, it inevitably disrupts family dynamics and the social notion of being together. In this paper, we explore “non-use” of mobile technology in a family setting. To do this, we designed the Pup-Lock provotype, a design provocation intended to challenge established expectations and practices around mobile device use at home. We report on a five-week in-depth study of using Pup-Lock with three families reflecting on their mobile device usage and their experience of non-use. Our findings illustrate how mobile use shapes social expectations and how over-use creates tensions in families. We contribute by showing how provoking non-use through design results in desirable and meaningful ways to increase family interaction. We discuss implications of designing for non-use to challenge established domestic practices around technology use

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Paper

CyclAir: A Bike Mounted Prototype for Real-Time Visualization of CO2 Levels While Cycling

Eike and Mikael got a short paper accepted at Interact'19 on CO2 measures for cyclists.

Eike Schneiders and Mikael B. Skov Abstract With the increased global focus on the environment, pollution, greenhouse gases, as well as carbon footprint, a multitude of initiatives have emerged in order to reduce air pollution and also increase awareness of air quality. In this paper, we developed CyclAir, a system enabling cyclists to monitor the traffic-related air pollution, measured in carbon dioxide (CO2) levels, both in real-time as well as retrospectively. Based on a first user study with seven test participants, we found that our participants were often confirmed about their preconceptions of the immediate CO2 level and air quality, but interestingly they were also sometimes surprised. 6 out of the 7 participants expressed willingness to change route choosing behavior when presented with new evidence about the air quality, even when this increased the route length.

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Paper

Lifelogging in the Wild: Participant Experiences of Using Lifelogging as a Research Tool

Anders and one of his former master students got a full paper accepted at INTERACT 2019

Anders Bruun and Martin Lynge Stentoft Abstract Research in the wild has emerged in HCI as a way of studying participant ex-periences in natural environments. Also, lifelogging tools such as physiologi-cal sensors have become more feasible for gathering data continuously in the wild. This could complement traditional in-waves approaches such as observa-tions and interviews. Given the emerging nature of sensors, few studies have employed these in the wild. We extend previous work by exploring the use of a physiological sensor and camera to examine how participants appropriate and experience wearing these. Participants were engaged in viewing the photos taken during the day and used the sensor and camera data to recall details about their daily experiences and reflect on these. However, participants also went through some efforts in making the camera blend into the environment in order not to break social norms.

Paper

Managing Big Data Analytics Projects: The Challenges of Realizing Value

Maria Hoffmann Jensen, Peter Axel Nielsen, John S. Persson Abstract Organizations invest significantly in Big Data Analytics (BDA), but only limited knowledge is available on the challenges faced by these organizations when trying to realize value in such projects. Benefits realization management (BRM) offers a perspective and processes for realizing value from information systems (IS) projects. Yet, limited research has investigated how this can be applied to development processes for BDA projects. We report an in-depth case study of a large organization’s BDA development processes and the inherent challenges of realizing value. From our analysis, we found eight necessary activities for realizing value in a BDA process and the challenges pertaining to each activity. These findings extend previous research on value creation in BDA projects with insights from practices in a large organization highly dedicated to exploiting Big Data. The paper discusses these findings as they relate to previous research and concludes with their implications for current BDA projects and future research.

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Paper

Investigating EV Driving as Meaningful Practice

Rikke, Kvist, Mikael, and Jesper got their full paper on EV practices accepted for OZCHI'19

Jensen R., Svangren M. , Skov MB., Kjeldskov J. Abstract Studies show that people find meanings such as freedom and independence in driving. However, the transition towards electric vehicles (EV’s) challenges these meanings as they present different driving experiences such as shorter driving range and missing supportive infrastructures. This suggests that people find other meaning in EV driving. This paper presents a qualitative study with 11 Danish participants who reflect on their experiences of driving EV’s in everyday life. As driving is embedded in many practices along with being a practice in itself, we draw on social practice theory as a frame- work to unfold how participants make use of technology to make EV driving a meaningful and desirable practice. We report on how participants facilitate their driving practices using interactive technology and charging infrastructure. We discuss these findings under three headings with ideas to inspire future HCI research and design for meaningful, sustainable EV driving practice.

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Investigating the Use of an Online Peer-to-Peer Car Sharing Service

Kvist, Margot, Mikael, and Jesper got their full paper on car sharing accepted for Interact'19

MK Svangren, M Brereton, MB Skov, J Kjeldskov Abstract Online peer-to-peer car sharing services are increasingly being used for ena-bling people to share cars between them. However, our body of knowledge about peer-to-peer car sharing is still limited in terms of understanding ac-tual use and which opportunities and challenges present for those who use them. In this paper, we investigate peer-to-peer car sharing between car-owners and car-borrowers as facilitated by the Australian car sharing ser-vice Car Next Door. We conducted a study with 6 car-owners and 10 car-borrowers. Our findings, outlined in four themes, suggest that P2P car shar-ing fuels different goals for both borrowers and owners. While it is com-plementing traditional means of transportation car sharing is also in itself a mean of mobility, for example, for recreational purposes. Further, the shar-ing service plays a central role in supporting the users to make it more con-venient to share cars, for example, by letting borrowers find and book cars instantly reducing resources needed to borrow a car. We further discuss our findings and relate it to existing literature providing opportunities and challenges for future research and design on car sharing in HCI.

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Paper

Interaction Design for Domestic Sound Zones

Stine, Peter, and Jesper got a short paper accepted for Audio Mostly '19

Stine S. Lundgaard, Peter Axel Nielsen, and Jesper Kjeldskov Abstract Sound zone systems have actively been developed for more than two decades. Building on this, we explore four different interaction design approaches for domestic sound zone systems: Tangible representation, light projection, familiar objects, and handhelds. These four approaches were conceived through a scenario-based workshop with HCI and IS experts responding to the functional challenges, opportunities, and requirements of interactive sound zones. The work presented in this paper contributes to development of interaction design for sound zone systems which is an essential parallel to the technical development.

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Paper

Investigating EV Driving as Meaningful Practice

Rikke, Michael, Mikael and Jesper got their paper accepted at OZCHI '19

Rikke Hagensby Jensen, Michael Kvist Svangren, Mikael B. Skov, and Jesper Kjeldskov Abstract Studies show that people find meanings such as freedom and independence in driving. However, the transition towards electric vehicles (EV's) challenges these meanings as they present different driving experiences such as shorter driving range and missing supportive infrastructures. This suggests that people find other meaning in EV driving. This paper presents a qualitative study with 11 Danish participants who reflect on their experiences of driving EV's in everyday life. As driving is embedded in many practices along with being a practice in itself, we draw on social practice theory as a framework to unfold how participants make use of technology to make EV driving a meaningful and desirable practice. We report on how participants facilitate their driving practices using interactive technology and charging infrastructure. We discuss these findings under three headings with ideas to inspire future HCI research and design for meaningful, sustainable EV driving practice.